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Self-supported Hierarchical Nanoporous Cu/Mo@MoOx Hybrid Electrodes as Robust Nonprecious Electrocatalysts for High-efficiency Hydrogen Evolution

[ Vol. 17 , Issue. 5 ]

Author(s):

Li-Ping Han, Hang Shi, Rui-Qi Yao, Wu-Bin Wan, Zi Wen, Xing-You Lang* and Qing Jiang*   Pages 728 - 735 ( 8 )

Abstract:


Background: The hydrogen evolution reaction is a crucial step in electrochemical water splitting to generate molecular hydrogen with high purity, but it usually suffers from a sluggish reaction kinetics in alkaline media because of additional water dissociation and/or improper adsorption energy of reactive hydrogen intermediates. It is desirable to design highly active and robust nonprecious electrocatalysts as alternatives to state-of-the-art commercially available Pt/C catalysts for large-scale hydrogen production via water-alkali electrolysis.

Methods: We developed monolithic nanoporous hybrid electrodes composed of electroactive Mo@MoOx nanoparticles, which are seamlessly integrated on hierarchical nanoporous Cu scaffold (Cu/Mo@MoOx) by making use of a spontaneous phase separation of Mo nanoparticles and subsequently, self-grown MoOx in chemical dealloying.

Results: Owing to the unique monolithic electrode architecture, in which the constituent Mo@MoOx nanoparticles work as electroactive sites and the hierarchical nanoporous Cu skeleton serves as fast electron-transfer and mass-transport pathways, the monolithic nanoporous Cu/Mo@MoOx hybrid electrode exhibits superior electrocatalysis in 1 M KOH, with a low Tafel slope of 66 mV dec−1 and outstanding stability. It only takes them ~185 mV overpotential to reach −400 mA cm−2, ~150 mV lower than that of nanoporous Cu supported Pt/C.

Conclusion: The outstanding electrochemical performance and excellent structural stability make nanoporous Cu/Mo@MoOx electrodes attractive alternatives to Pt/C catalysts in alkaline-based devices.

Keywords:

Nanoporous metals, hybrid materials, hydrogen evolution reaction, electrocatalysts, metal oxides, dealloying.

Affiliation:

Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130022, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130022, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130022, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130022, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130022, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130022, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130022



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